Libertarian Commentary on the News, #14-23C: Unholy alliances?

By Nathan Barton

Good evening!  As we near the end of a very long week with more than 2,000 miles on the road so far, here is the last commentary of the week.  By the way, today is “Flag Day” and the US Army’s birthday (239 years, if I recall rightly).  Flags are important symbols of freedom, liberty, and national unity and NOT images or objects to be worshiped.  The Army’s loyalty is to the Constitution (or was, when the Constitution was in force) and therefore to the ideals of liberty, and NOT to any person or “the nation.”  May the Army become an institution which recognizes – from the Chief of Staff on down to the newest cadet and private recruit – what its loyalties and priorities and missions are: to defend the Constitution and the liberties that the Constitution was intended to protect and preserve.  Please, oh Lord, grant us the wisdom to repent from our folly.

Is there any more unholy alliance in the Fifty States today than Congress, unions, and multinational corporations?  Apparently all three have conspired for more than half a year to keep an Irish airline, Norwegian International, from offering flights between US/Canadian and European Cities, for 40% below standard trans-Atlantic fares.  Congress members piously claim it is about “protecting consumers.”  Yeah, right.

Another FedGov proposal to “protect customers” may have been staked in the heart at least for now.  An FDA regulation to prohibit the use of wooden shelves for curing cheese as “unsanitary” and “unsafe” really never existed, according to an FDA press release after tens of thousands of people screamed loudly when word got out about the PUBLISHED regulation.  Never fear, the FDA will sneak it in some other way and time.  Enjoy your specialty cheeses while you can, remembering what happened to many German beers and English milk chocolate.  And remember, there are “consumer groups” out there who get a real thrill out of taking away foods that people really like, just because they can.

Oh NO.  Not that I expect anything better from www.TheDailySheeple.com, but that hoary old list of “FEMA Camps” is back again, with even MORE errors creeping in, and a few new and even MORE bogus locations listed.  This idiotic list has been circulating since the early 1990s. This current incarnation features a half-dozen of the most fake and hyped claims about secret UN bases and the government giving itself more powers over the last decade and a half.  I don’t know who the idiots are who write and circulate this trash, but they know little or nothing about the geography and history of much of the nation, don’t know how to use even the most simple of on-line resources like local aerial and satellite photography and mapping, and apparently are incapable of driving anyplace to check out their claims.  Even I am able to come up with a more realistic and justifiable list of “FEMA camps and sites and plans” that would withstand more scrutiny than these tabulated (or not) lists, which among other things, has “UNICOR” as a state of the union (UNICOR is the brand name of Federal Prison Industries).  Just to look at a few of the sites listed:  there are a lot of Japanese internment camps from WW2, including the infamous Hart Mountain in Wyoming: these sites are virtually nothing more than a few concrete slabs, gravel roads visible only because the grass and weeds are slightly different from the rest of the ground, a chimney or two, and a pitiful historical or commemoration marker.  In South Dakota, the “Yankton Federal Prison Camp” is a small federal correctional facility with a few (permanent) buildings and just enough grounds for the exercise yards and employee parking, on the edge of a major South Dakota city.  The other site doesn’t even (and didn’t even) exist: a “relocation camp” (some list it as a “POW camp”) north of Edgemont.  (Maybe they got their directions wrong and meant the abandoned ordinance depot SOUTH of Edgemont, built during WW2 with NO POW or relocation camps, and with a plethora of WW2-built “temporary 10-20 year life” barracks and such, abandoned since 1968 (almost 50 years!) and in almost total decay.)  Several are major army installations (Fort Riley, KS, and Fort Carson, CO) where any purpose-built detention facilities would stick out like sore thumbs, and the grapevine would make it impossible to hide these things.  If these websites and webzines and organizations want to be taken seriously, they will STOP publishing this sort of garbage, or at least do a far better job of editing, reviewing, and researching the claims.  I don’t doubt that there ARE designated locations for detention camps and plans to build some, but ANYone with brains and a bit of common sense and technical knowledge can identify far more probable locations and methods of setting up, opening, and operating such.  Idiotic lists like this are worse than disinformation, because the opposition doesn’t have to work hard to spread the bogus information.

Speaking of bogus, or at least poor and uninformed work, Godfather Politics has damaged its credibility by publishing a poorly written article listing “articles of impeachment” promoted to bring the Fuehrer “to justice.”  Not only are these written in poor, ambiguous, and decidedly non-legal style, but some are not just vague but wrong in statements of fact.  Many are apparently assuming that Congress has had power stolen from it, not that Congress pretty much surrendered its power to the executive branch.  Even the grammar is bad in places.  (Besides that, there is a simple five-word answer to EVERY charge:  “Joe Biden and John Bohner.”  Impeaching one without simultaneously getting rid of all three is more than “jumping from the frying pan into the fire,”  it is suicide.  Come ON, people, do some editing: not just marking up submittals, but using some wisdom in deciding NOT to print garbage!

A high school graduating class in Virginia defied threats to the school from the ACLU by voluntarily singing “God be with you til we meet again” during their graduation, thus continuing a 70+ year old tradition.  Hopefully the students will continue defying anyone who tries to force them to be “politically correct” or threatens them if they do not kowtow to popular culture and demands.  And hopefully, more and more people will learn from their efforts. (Obviously, the high school and district administration did not exercise enough control over the students for all the time that they had them.)

In a stunning Tea Party Movement victory, Eric Cantor of Virginia is toast and the entire power structure in the House of Representatives is tilting.  Or so it could be, if the insurgents in the GOP are able to get their act together.  But at the same time, Lindsey Graham defeated those challenging him in part because they could not get themselves organized.  Stupid?  Yes, but that is the GOP in the 21st Century (and for the last 60 years).

The WaPo’s Kathleen Parker thinks (rather stupidly and pridefully) that the unfortunate fate of the one non-perp/non-cop killed in the CiCi Pizza/Wal-Mart killings in Nevada last week proves that civilians should be disarmed.  It appears that the sin of all three of the victims of this young murderous (and stupid) couple was a lack of alertness and threat awareness.  Nothing is perfect: people do and WILL die: there is no “zero risk” when it comes to criminals or fanatics.

Mama’s Note: None of us were there in Nevada, and I’ve not seen any of the video, but it would seem that Mr. Wilcox neglected (or didn’t think he had time for) one of the most basic parts of engaging an armed aggressor. He evidently did not seek cover, or to put his back to something like a wall or other object that would protect him from another shooter. He zeroed in on the male perpetrator (who was not actually shooting at the time anyway) and ignored everyone else. He was most definitely a “hero” for his efforts, but might have survived if he’d made better choices or had better training.

Why did he draw and fire then, engaging someone who was not shooting at the moment? We will never know, but this is a wake up call for all of us who carry a gun. The best way I know of to prepare for something like this is to understand the tactics necessary for cover and concealment before one engages. Play the possible scenes in your mind and think of what you might do in them to both stop the threat and maintain as much cover and safety for yourself as possible. Think about how you would deal with the need to shoot in a crowd like that, your line of fire and what you might do to reduce or eliminate the possibility of hitting innocent bystanders. This is serious business, and if you are not prepared to put some real time, training effort and thought into it, you just might not want to bother carrying a gun.

I’ve used visualization for a long time, and will most certainly do some deep thinking and formulate a great many more and new such scenes to plan for the unpredictable and the terrible possibility of such attacks. I pray with all my might they will never come into my life, but I intend to be as ready as possible if they do. No, a risk free life is simply not an option, but there are things any of us can do to reduce that risk. It takes thought, effort and usually less time per day than watching the evening “news.”

About TPOL-Nathan

Nathan Barton is a christian, self-governor (free-market anarchist), husband, father, professional engineer, Engineer army officer, private businessman, and writer, teacher, and preacher. He works and lives mostly in four western states, and is Southern by heritage and Westerner by birth, upbringing, and choice.
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6 Responses to Libertarian Commentary on the News, #14-23C: Unholy alliances?

  1. Bear says:

    “What I actually question is why he would draw and shoot then…”

    Without hard data — the video you mention — we probably won’t know. Again, I’ve seen multiple versions of what happened there, ranging from “the man was down and incapacitated” to “he was hit and building a little fortress to fight it out” to “he was shooting every customer in sight”. I’ve stopped reading about it because everything amounts to lamestream muddia trying to scoop the competition regardless of the lack of facts… so they invent them.

    Funny how most analyses of why whatever media outlet is failing talk about competition from the Internet/Talk Radio/Social Media/whatever, but never address the point that the media is a pisspoor place to get data becuae they make up whatever they think will sell. And if I want fiction, books tend to be plotted better, with more believable twists.

    • MamaLiberty says:

      Boy, oh boy… isn’t that last the truth. I have to watch myself that I don’t take the “news” on line too seriously either. Don’t listen to radio or watch TV, so the internet is it… but the truly reliable sources there for news are few and far between. Seems like someone would want to fill that gap, somehow. :(

  2. “Flags are important symbols of freedom, liberty, and national unity and NOT images or objects to be worshiped.”

    Flags originated as battle banners: markers that gave the cannon fodder something visible at a distance that they could follow. Modern flags, in some cases at least, are symbols, but the thing symbolized need not bear any relation to its condition in reality.

    • MamaLiberty says:

      Indeed, Francis. They are symbols, and can be very powerful, but can so easily be misunderstood or misused. For me, the US flag has long been a clear symbol of all that is unholy and evil about the government of the US, and I want no part of it. I owe it, nor the government, any sort of allegiance or loyalty. A “citizen” is the property of the entity that claims him/her, not a sovereign of their own life and possessions. I am not a willing “citizen” of any place or polity either, though the US and state governments have no problem continuing to consider me their chattel slave.

      I decided long ago that the Gadsen flag was the only one I would fly, and I have not flown that for several years now either. I don’t need such symbols myself.

  3. Bear says:

    There’s a reason I haven’t written about the Nevada shooting: A heck of a lot of stories and “reporting”, but damned few verifiable facts. I saw mor than one write-up that claimed the accused were wearing their costumes at the time, although one had it that the guy was dressed as Peter Pan while another said it was one of the Batman badguys (both versions were in the wild before the shooters were even ID’d). Then there’s the “they were Nazis” vs. “they were making fun of Nazis” dichotomy.

    Regarding Wilcox’s situational awareness… who knows? Again, some reports have it that he rushed in without checking out the situation. Others say that Amanda Miller had moved into the crowd with a shopping cart and was pretending to be an innocent bystander; if that were the case… humans don’t come equipped with 360 degree optics. At some point you have to turn your back on the perceived lesser threat and take your chances.

    • MamaLiberty says:

      Indeed, Bear… All I said was that seeking cover, and NOT having his back to the crowd, would likely have been a better tactic. We have no idea if that was an option, of course. Nobody has any way to know who else is a killer in such a case, which is exactly why he should not have turned his back on anyone if at all possible. What I actually question is why he would draw and shoot then, if the man was not shooting or threatening anyone just then. What caused him to draw and fire? We’ll probably never know, but I’d sure love to study those videos.

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